team pup n suds


shadowcow:

kingmunsterxvii:

febricant:

SHIA LEBEOUF LIVE

THIS IS NOT A DRILL

The entire history of art has been leading to this monumental moment

Holy shit.


pinerosolanno:

The Craft

pinerosolanno:

The Craft



okaywowcool:

sparkly bat patch - $9.50



seriously wanting to cry today because people suck and everyone is in my way and I just want to be in bed.



people are #notallmen-ing it up on Facebook and I’m just sitting here waiting for my friends to shut it down.


thepeoplesrecord:

This week, two incidents of street harassment escalated into violent attacks against womenOctober 9, 2014
One woman in Detroit was shot and killed after refusing to give a stranger her phone number. Another woman in New York got her throat slashed for refusing to go on a date with a stranger.
Those are just two examples of violence perpetrated against women over the past week. And while those cases grabbed news headlines, other acts of aggression on the street may have very well gone unreported. Advocates working to stop street harassment say the two incidents are a clear illustration of why catcalls and come-ons aren’t harmless for the people on the receiving end.
“You never know when street harassment is going to escalate into violence — and too often it does,” Emily May, the co-founder and current executive director of Hollaback!, an international nonprofit working to combat street harassment, said in a statement. “These recent cases are chilling.”
In Detroit, witnesses say that a 27-year-old mother of three named Mary Spears was harassed by a man after leaving the funeral of a family friend. He was asking for her number, which she refused to give to him because she was in a relationship. But the man wouldn’t leave her alone. Once her fiancee tried to intervene, the man opened fire, killing Spears and wounding five other people.
“What was on your mind that you could be so evil,” Spears’ aunt told a local Fox affiliate. “Because she said no to you?”
A similar situation recently unfolded in New York City, according to the New York Post. Police say that a man in Queens started pestering a 26-year-old to go on a date with him, but she turned him down. He reportedly became enraged, grabbed her, and slashed her neck with a blade. She was rushed to the hospital in critical condition but is expected to survive.
It’s not uncommon for women to become the subject of violence if they turn down men’s romantic advances, a phenomenon that was put on full display in May after Elliott Rodger went on a shooting rampage against “every single blonde slut” who rejected him. That tragedy, which resulted in the deaths of seven people in the Santa Barbara area, sparked a national conversation about gender-based violence. It also gave rise to a Tumblr called “When Women Refuse” to compile incidences like the ones that just occurred this week. Sometimes, the people who try to intervene on women’s behalf also end up on the receiving end of this violence.
Groups like Hollaback! say that it’s important to think about catcalling in this larger context. While some people may think of it as harmless, or expect women to interpret it as a compliment, it’s actually part of damaging culture that disempowers women and treats them like objects at the disposal of men.
“Street harassment is on a spectrum of gender-based violence,” May pointed out. “When street harassment is okay, it makes groping okay. And when groping is okay, it makes assault okay. And when assault is okay, it makes murder okay. We need to stop this cycle where it starts.”
Nonetheless, harassment in public spaces is routine for many women. According to a recent report from the advocacy group Stop Street Harassment, an estimated 65 percent of women have experienced unwanted attention from strangers on the street. Most women report feeling angry, annoyed, disgusted, nervous, and scared when they’re catcalled, and — for good reason — they’re often concerned it will escalate into something more threatening.
“I think people are starting to understand that these cases aren’t just assault. They are hate crimes, borne out of the idea that if you’re a woman walking through public space then you must be public property,” May told ThinkProgress via email. May pointed out that, while resistance to this idea isn’t new, modern technology has given activists an “unprecedented opportunity” to push back, both by easily documenting incidences of street harassment in real time and by disseminating stories of everyday violence through blogs and social media.
SourcePhoto: Stop telling women to smile by Tatyana Fazlalizadeh

thepeoplesrecord:

This week, two incidents of street harassment escalated into violent attacks against women
October 9, 2014

One woman in Detroit was shot and killed after refusing to give a stranger her phone number. Another woman in New York got her throat slashed for refusing to go on a date with a stranger.

Those are just two examples of violence perpetrated against women over the past week. And while those cases grabbed news headlines, other acts of aggression on the street may have very well gone unreported. Advocates working to stop street harassment say the two incidents are a clear illustration of why catcalls and come-ons aren’t harmless for the people on the receiving end.

“You never know when street harassment is going to escalate into violence — and too often it does,” Emily May, the co-founder and current executive director of Hollaback!, an international nonprofit working to combat street harassment, said in a statement. “These recent cases are chilling.”

In Detroit, witnesses say that a 27-year-old mother of three named Mary Spears was harassed by a man after leaving the funeral of a family friend. He was asking for her number, which she refused to give to him because she was in a relationship. But the man wouldn’t leave her alone. Once her fiancee tried to intervene, the man opened fire, killing Spears and wounding five other people.

“What was on your mind that you could be so evil,” Spears’ aunt told a local Fox affiliate. “Because she said no to you?”

A similar situation recently unfolded in New York City, according to the New York Post. Police say that a man in Queens started pestering a 26-year-old to go on a date with him, but she turned him down. He reportedly became enraged, grabbed her, and slashed her neck with a blade. She was rushed to the hospital in critical condition but is expected to survive.

It’s not uncommon for women to become the subject of violence if they turn down men’s romantic advances, a phenomenon that was put on full display in May after Elliott Rodger went on a shooting rampage against “every single blonde slut” who rejected him. That tragedy, which resulted in the deaths of seven people in the Santa Barbara area, sparked a national conversation about gender-based violence. It also gave rise to a Tumblr called “When Women Refuse” to compile incidences like the ones that just occurred this week. Sometimes, the people who try to intervene on women’s behalf also end up on the receiving end of this violence.

Groups like Hollaback! say that it’s important to think about catcalling in this larger context. While some people may think of it as harmless, or expect women to interpret it as a compliment, it’s actually part of damaging culture that disempowers women and treats them like objects at the disposal of men.

“Street harassment is on a spectrum of gender-based violence,” May pointed out. “When street harassment is okay, it makes groping okay. And when groping is okay, it makes assault okay. And when assault is okay, it makes murder okay. We need to stop this cycle where it starts.”

Nonetheless, harassment in public spaces is routine for many women. According to a recent report from the advocacy group Stop Street Harassment, an estimated 65 percent of women have experienced unwanted attention from strangers on the street. Most women report feeling angry, annoyed, disgusted, nervous, and scared when they’re catcalled, and — for good reason — they’re often concerned it will escalate into something more threatening.

“I think people are starting to understand that these cases aren’t just assault. They are hate crimes, borne out of the idea that if you’re a woman walking through public space then you must be public property,” May told ThinkProgress via email. May pointed out that, while resistance to this idea isn’t new, modern technology has given activists an “unprecedented opportunity” to push back, both by easily documenting incidences of street harassment in real time and by disseminating stories of everyday violence through blogs and social media.

Source
Photo: Stop telling women to smile by Tatyana Fazlalizadeh


“Catcalling is not sweet or empowering. It’s harassment, with potentially deadly consequences.”
In the past two weeks, two women have been brutally attacked for rejecting men’s advances (via micdotcom)

kind-of-feral:

I wanted to laboriously and painstakingly give attention to all this phrases that were verbally thrown at me in a moment.

"You Are My Duchess" - embroidered catcalls by Elana Adler


today’s adventure in street harassment: had to call the cops because a man in a black pickup circled me for twenty mins before stopping, turning his lights off, and flashing me his gun.


brightwalldarkroom:

David Bowie and Catherine Deneuve, on the set of The Hunger (1983)

brightwalldarkroom:

David Bowie and Catherine Deneuve, on the set of The Hunger (1983)


“Wait...you're a Satanist? I thought you were an Atheist? (Or do you identify as Satanist in the political or philosophical sense rather than the theological sense?)”

—Anonymous

baroness:

I am technically an atheist. I agree with the basic tenets of La Veyan Satanism - not theistic Satanism, which would require belief not only in the deity Satan but also, obviously, his single god counterpart as worshiped by western religions. (Also, I hear that theistic Satanists are just a bunch of idiots who worship, like, every fictional monster ever, so…) The basic principles behind The Church of Satan pretty much boil down to:

1) There is no god;

2) Religion is violent, oppressive, and excessive; and

3) Everyone should just do whatever they can to take care of themselves and the people they love, as long as no one is unnecessarily hurting anyone else.

However, I don’t agree with the rampant sexism/misogyny in the literature and rituals laid out in The Satanic Bible. So, if we’re throwing around labels, I would enjoy calling myself a Satanic anarcha-feminist because why the fuck not, all three of those labels combined encompass my beliefs.

If you’re interested, last year I laid out a big (shitty, handwritten) list of things I agree with / disagree with in La Veyan Satanism. I even included page numbers & citations from The Satanic Bible!

Also: http://baroness.tumblr.com/tagged/satanism


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